Isabel Allende's New Masterpiece

Three people, one story. A 60-year-old human rights scholar, a young, undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, and a 62-year-old lecturer from Chile form a deep bond from very different places. You'll want to find out why.

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The Author
Isabel Allende — novelist, feminist, and philanthropist—is one of the most widely read authors in the world. More than 67 million copies of her books have been sold. Born in Peru and raised in Chile, Allende won worldwide acclaim when The House of the Spirits, her bestselling first novel, which began as a letter to her dying grandfather, was published in 1982. Since then, she has written more than twenty bestselling and critically acclaimed books, including Of Love and Shadows, Eva Luna, Daughter of Fortune, Paula, Island Beneath the Sea, and The Japanese Lover. She has received an honorary doctorate from Harvard University, was inducted into the California Hall of Fame, and received the PEN Center Lifetime Achievement Award and the Anisfield-Wolf Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2014, President Barack Obama awarded Allende the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. She lives in California. Her website is IsabelAllende.com.

New York Times bestselling author Isabel Allende returns with a sweeping novel about three very different people who are brought together in a mesmerizing story that journeys from present-day Brooklyn to Guatemala in the recent past to 1970s Chile and Brazil.

Amid the biggest Brooklyn snowstorm in living memory Richard Bowmaster, a lonely university professor in his sixties, hits the car of Evelyn Ortega, a young, undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, and what at first seems an inconvenience takes a more serious turn when Evelyn comes to his house, seeking help. At a loss, the professor asks his tenant, Lucia Maraz, a fellow academic from Chile, for her advice.

As these three lives intertwine, each will discover truths about how they have been shaped by the tragedies they witnessed, and Richard and Lucia will find unexpected, long overdue love. Allende, who has been called "one of the greatest writers of our time" (Washington Post), returns here to themes that have propelled some of her finest work: political injustice, the art of survival, and the essential nature of—and our need for—love.

The Author
Isabel Allende — novelist, feminist, and philanthropist—is one of the most widely read authors in the world. More than 67 million copies of her books have been sold. Born in Peru and raised in Chile, Allende won worldwide acclaim when The House of the Spirits, her bestselling first novel, which began as a letter to her dying grandfather, was published in 1982. Since then, she has written more than twenty bestselling and critically acclaimed books, including Of Love and Shadows, Eva Luna, Daughter of Fortune, Paula, Island Beneath the Sea, and The Japanese Lover. She has received an honorary doctorate from Harvard University, was inducted into the California Hall of Fame, and received the PEN Center Lifetime Achievement Award and the Anisfield-Wolf Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2014, President Barack Obama awarded Allende the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. She lives in California. Her website is IsabelAllende.com.

"Roots are not in landscape or a country, or a people, they are inside you." - Isabel Allende Image: By Paragraph

"Roots are not in landscape or a country, or a people, they are inside you." - Isabel Allende Image: By Paragraph
Early Feedback
A delight to read Isabel Allende. Three lives with heavy luggage on their backs, three stories between the hard and sad past and an event that gives a turn to their lives and gives them new opportunities and hopes. A "soft" narrative, light, simple, with elements present in previous works and so characteristic of the author.

Why Yes?
Mystery, thriller, and hopeful love story all in one. Easy to digest and apply to real life.

Why Now?
Speaks to current issues about migration, gender violence, economic precariousness of certain countries, diseases of the mind

It's Like...
It's like Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Perfect For…
Fans of romance, history, and mystery who could use a little hope.

Heavy or Light?
Light (comedic, beautiful, a love story) but has some heavy undertones (human psychology, commentary on the status of undocumented people in the US).